Is it OK for Remain to mention Jo Cox?

For anybody who has been living under a rock in a cave that is underwater in Vanuatu, Jo Cox, the Labour MP for Batley and Spen in Leeds, was shot at a constituency surgery and later died from her injuries. She is the first sitting MP to have been killed since Ian Gow in 1990 who was murdered by the IRA.

She supported remaining within the European Union. This creates an issue – when is it OK for Remain supporters to mention her?

The late MP wrote an article advocating Remain and Britain Stronger In Europe – the official Remain campaign – shared this on their Facebook page. David Cameron then also shared this on Twitter.

What I’m about to say may sound flippant but it’s not meant to be – it is ridiculous to illustrate a point. Obviously, it would be offensive to produce and deliver leaflets with pictures of her and her children and with “Vote Remain or hate Jo Cox” or something similar.

What should we say?

David Cameron and Stronger In both have obligations to discuss Jo Cox. It would be bizarre not to mention an article she had written on the EU referendum. Clearly, Jo Cox wanted this article shared. Not only was it reasonable to do so, it was an obligation of both the campaign and the Prime Minister to ensure her voice was heard; indeed, it is the last time it ever will be.

However, “win it for Jo” is not OK. Voters should listen to the strength of her arguments, not the pang of grief at her death.

Claiming that one should not vote Leave because a proponent of Leave murdered her is also not OK. Whatever unpalatable statements Leave campaigners make, they are not murderers. To paint them as implicit accessories to such a tragedy cheapens Jo Cox’s death and unfairly denigrates those who simply believe something different.

I think when speaking to voters, Remain campaigners should concentrate on the issues. However, if Jo Cox’s death comes up, it is not unreasonable to mention she was a Remain campaigner. Campaigners should be careful not to guilt-trip voters into voting Remain nor should they labour the issue of her death.

It is sad that many voters have changed their minds on the basis that a Remain campaigner died but this does not affect the legitimacy of the result. All elections and referendums can be won and lost on events ultimately irrelevant to question at hand. It is rare the event is so tragic.

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